The MVP Award - Lady Loves Pinstripes The MVP Award - Lady Loves Pinstripes The MVP Award - Lady Loves Pinstripes
 

The MVP Award

The MVP Award is given out each year.

The Baseball Writers Association of America (BBWAA), a professional association for baseball journalists, votes for the recipient.

What qualities does a player have to have for the MVP?

Is there actually defined criteria or rules that have to be incorporated?

Shouldn’t the people who have baseball’s best interest at heart vote the award on?

These debates caused by unclear terms and outdated guidelines are headaches that are fully avoidable.

Baseball, America’s Pastime with so much history is being treated so carelessly it is sad for a fan like myself.

Baseball in itself as a sport has been nothing but selfless for our enjoyment.

It’s time to get that back. Here are my four thought:

1) The dictionary reads as follows:

Most, in the dictionary means in or to the highest degree or extent.

The definition of valuable is having admirable or esteemed qualities or characteristics.

An award is a tangible symbol signifying approval or distinction.

Those three words, defined are what a player must represent to win.

2) “Most Outstanding Statistical Player.”

If you want to pick the MVP solely on statistics every year, appoint a statistical team.

Or even easier a computer can name the winner. Who cares about the person and how he represents the sport.

Stats are purely physical numbers.

Actually it must frustrate players who win this MVP award on a team that stinks. Alex Rodriguez won it while playing on the Texas Rangers who finished in last place that season. Talk about how confusing that must be, on top of beyond frustrating to be the best and stuck with the worst group.

Leadership, sportsmanship and respect for the game in general are what I consider to be includes as the player who is the Most Valuable.

Stats seem to dictate the outcome, as numbers hold players value back as an excuse or an answer or even better, the explanation.

MVP = stats = attention = HUGE contract = goals.

And we were all are so perturbed by the PED use in baseball.

3) The rules of the voting remain the same as they were written on the first ballot in 1931:

1. Actual value of a player to his team, that is, strength of offense and defense.
2. Number of games played.
3. General character, disposition, loyalty and effort.
4. Former winners are eligible.
5. Members of the committee may vote for more than one member of a team.

And can someone explain how Jeter shouldn’t be on the top of this list?

Joe Mauer also missed 22 games this season, which has to be incorporated.

Hey if you were home sick from school or work for 22 days, would you not be expelled or fired?

Even if you produced at a high level, showing up consistently has to play a part it is part of life.

4) I personally think that the players’ themselves should vote for the Most Valuable Player. The players play the game with each other day in and day out which gives them the insider knowledge of what really goes on. As it being their profession to be represented, why shouldn’t it be their choice of who is the most valuable.

The job the media has done portraying this era of baseball surely doesn’t deserve to be the ones voting for the award. They feed off these athletes mistakes and make more money exploiting baseball, so why are they the deciders?

The money being earned exploiting court sealed documents is not valuing anything but themselves and their respected publications.

As a fan, I think you have to value the game before you get to vote for it’s most prestigious award.

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2 Comments

  1. South Side Reporter says:

    Interesting idea, but I disagree with the players voting. It would just become a popularity contest. I.E. if somebody who was CLEARLY the best was a jerk to other players, he wouldn't get votes…

  2. Kate says:

    I see your point but if he is a jerk that should be taken into account. Sportsmanship and class is part of being valued or more importantly valuing his peers.