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New York Yankees Breaking News: Is Jorge Posada Calling It Quits? Or Throwing A Fit?

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New York Yankees GM Brian Cashman held an impromptu announcement during the second inning of the Boston Red Sox game talking to FOX’s Ken Rosenthal.

What everyone thought was skipper Joe Girardi scratching DH Jorge Posada out of the line-up was not the case, as Cashman said that Posada pulled himself out of the line-up prior to the game.

Cashman went on the say that Posada will be addressing the media after the game, at his own request.

When Rosenthal asked Cashman what Posada’s actions meant for Posada’s future, he declined comment. Said he did not want to speak for Posada.

Cashman look grim and while the twittering universe is going nuts; some tweets are speculating that Posada might ask for a trade.

I disagree and think it sounds more like a retirement announcement. Since Posada has moved from being the Yankees starting catcher to full-time DH things haven’t fared so well for the 39-year-old Posada.

Either way it will be a very sad state of affairs for the Yankees and their fans, as Posada is one of the core four and he was on five World Championship teams for the pinstripes.

Guess all anyone can do is just hold out breath till the game ends.

Here are some interesting tweets to consider:

@JackCurryYES Jack Curry

If Posada retired, it would be strange, sad way for to go. I’ve asked multiple team officials what they expect. None could speak w certainty

@JackCurryYES Jack Curry

According to person briefed on Posada’s exchange with Girardi, Posada told mgr he was “insulted” about hitting 9th and “threw a hissy fit.”

@PeteAbe Pete Abraham

Complicating the issue: Jeter and Posada are best of friends. If Girardi loses Jeter, it’ll get even more ugly

 

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New York Yankees: Let The Media Manslaughter Begin

The New York Yankees lost again last night, this time it was to their bitter rival Boston Red Sox with a score of 5-4.

In addition the Yankees are no longer in first place in the AL East, a place they have sat the entire season up until now but the Rays are now two games ahead in the standings.

Are the Yankees slumping?

When a team is not winning as much as they are losing then yes that would be considered slumping; which is the current state of the Yankees who have lost seven of their last 10 games.

This happens to every team at one point in the season, if not two or three. The Yankees are not a total wreck, as they are just not connecting on all fronts but they are not terrible just yet.

Still, no one throws the Yankees a bone; specifically the media that continue to support the Twins and Rangers with a bevy of excuses and reasons that things will get better.

Here are the Yankees headlines:

Yankees Are Scary Bad These Days

By Wallace Matthews ESPN New York

Vulnerability Shows in a Longtime Rivalry

By Dave Caldwell New York Times Continue reading ‘New York Yankees: Let The Media Manslaughter Begin’ »

New York Yankees: Sloppy Play Leads To Second Place

This is going to be a short post, as last nights 11-5 loss to the Kansas City Royals was hard enough to watch and I still am unwinding from it.

Why so much distress?

It is more like frustration because my tennis coach taught me there were two ways to lose.

The first way is when you get out played and the winner beats you.

The other way, also deemed unacceptable was to lose on your own errors. That he said was why he made me run so much.

I never understood at the time why half or more of practice was spent running with my racket in hand and always pointing up towards the sky. That was because he believed that when the racquet head was cocked to the sky, it sent a subconscious negative message.

Regardless, the New York Yankees were sloppy. Not the best way to start a series against the Boston Red Sox, a 13-game stretch and to realize that just yesterday they were the best team in the AL East.

Hopefully the Yankees will realize with a win tonight could erase all of this tomorrow.

Look, I am not some neurotic freak about losing a game, a series or dropping a spot in the rankings.

Until I look at the Yankees schedule, which gets significantly tougher with a trip out West followed by inter-league play against he Reds, Brewers, Rockies and Cubs.

So, losing games that they should win get much harder to swallow, and unlike other teams (Rangers, Twins, Giants) the Yankees don’t get thrown a bone by the media, fans or their opponants.

Losing streaks are funny.  If you lose at the beginning, you get off to a bad start.  If you lose in the middle of the season, you’re in a slump.  If you lose at the end, you’re choking.  ~Gene Mauch

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New York Yankees: Nova vs. O’Sullivan In Rubber Game

NOVA vs. O’SULLIVAN:

In the rubber game Thursday night Yankees rookie Ivan Nova will take the bump, in a game the Yankees would like to win before the Boston Red Sox arrive on Friday for a weekend series.

Nova has looked better with each start this season posting a 3-2 record, with a 4.08 ERA over 35 innings pitched. In his last start he pitched over seven innings against the tough Rangers line-up and in two starts prior Nova went a full six in both.

The Royals will counter with righty Sean O’Sullivan who kept the Yankee bats flat back in 2010 in their first meeting when O’Sullivan was an Angel…this comes as no surprise.

Luckily for the Bombers, just days later the second time they faced O’Sullivan the bats had figured him out. This season O’Sullivan has a 1-2 record, posting a 3.41 ERA over four starts. He has given up just one home-run, 11 earned runs, with 14 strikeouts, 14 walks over 29 innings pitched.

Look for A-rod to pound on the kid, as he has a .444 batting average, with four hits, two doubles, one home-run and two RBIs in his nine career at-bats against the 23-year-old O’Sullivan. While the red-hot Curtis Granderson has three home-runs in seven at-bats and I expect (pray) both will come up big.

I thought the Yankees might lose one game out of all three against Kansas City otherwise they would sweep, but now the series is up in the air; and so is first place in the AL East if the Yankees loss a second game in a row.

I predict the Yankees will win this game 6-2 and take the series. Nova has proven himself and if he can go six innings that would be another step up for the 24-year-old.

Bottom line is this Yankee team knows when they need to win and even though this game is not vital, it is sure darn close.

A little cushion would sure not hurt before playing the Red Sox, Rays, Orioles, Mets and Toronto… all in a row with no day-off till May 26th when they head out West.

YANKEES QUICK NOTE:

Looking at the bigger picture, it is so mind-boggling is how much time was wasted focusing on the Yankees rotation issues coming into the season and it has literally been the team’s saving grace.

The starters have given up five earned runs or more only three times in 2011, which is tied with the Indians as a baseball leading best so far this season. I mean who knew… other then GM Brian Cashman?

The Yankees pitching has been solid as can be so far in 2011, but we have all been so brainwashed into thinking that a man’s age represents his skills but that is just not true in baseball. For some reason no one wants to accept this fact and I don’t know why? That is for another post…but soon.

 

 

 

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New York Yankees: Stranding Runners Not The Only Reason They Lost To Royals

TELL ME SOMETHING I DON’T KNOW:

When any major, minor or little-league baseball team loses a game or a few in a row the same old rationalization is given by the media, as if they had enlightened both players and fans to something we didn’t know already.

This phrase gets used in many different ways, but it is almost a cop-out because it always applies to the losers in baseball.

You must already know what I am referring too?

It’s the notorious cause allotted to losing… leaving too many runners in scoring position.

This is not some revelation that the media is giving us night after night.

Clearly when a team loses it is because they could not score more runs than the opposing team.

It doesn’t take Einstein to realize that the losing team’s hitters either are left out to dry or didn’t make it on base at all.

No one is denying that stranding runners on base isn’t always a legitimate excuse, but it doesn’t mean the losing team necessarily hit worse than their opponents… correct? Maybe?

For example:

Team B beat Team A with a final score of 3-2.

Team A got on base 13 out of 15 times, but only two of the 13 baserunners actually crossed home plate.

Team B reached base successfully three out of 11 hits, but the third hit was a 3 run home run as the other two players who reached base happen to be on at that time.

Even thought Team A got the loss, the stats prove they hit better than Team B throughout the game. Most likely Team A pitched better too if out of 11 hits only three runners made it to first base safely, which obviously includes the homer too.

My point is many other elements go on during a baseball game that weigh greatly on the results other than the same old and obvious answer that we are guilty of using too much. Hey it is easy and there is always truth behind it, but not always as much as we make it out to be.

YANKEES vs. ROYALS:

A perfect example of the above happened on Wednesday night, when the Royals beat the Yankees 3-2 in the 11th inning. The Yankees did not lose solely due to stranding runners; it was a one run, extra inning affair that could have gone either way in all honesty. Continue reading ‘New York Yankees: Stranding Runners Not The Only Reason They Lost To Royals’ »

New York Yankees: Uh-Oh You Forgot Derek Jeter Can Still Play Baseball

First let me make one thing clear, I have never once doubted the baseball ability of New York Yankees Captain Derek Jeter on this blog.

The same cannot be said for most of the sports media, as across the board no one has had Jeter’s back.

Has Jeter been struggling?

Yes, but the headlines were harsh and the stories themselves were even worse, especially for a player that has never left reporters hanging after a game.

To say all the negativity didn’t affect Jeter would be ludicrous, as it was one of the hottest topics since Brett Favre dropped off the earth.

Just rehashing the hysteria after Jeter was awarded the 2010 Gold Glove at shortstop makes my head spin. Articles like Rob Neyer‘s Gold Glove results mixed, as usual was just downright mean. A lot of the blame for articles like the above goes to ESPN, who should never let Neyer write about the Yankees in the first place. My guess is Rob Klapisch might regret writing this article a little to early Derek Jeter seems back in swing of things for Yankees published just a week ago on May 2nd and makes you wonder why the person Klapisch quoted wanted to remain anonymous?

Did everyone forget who votes for the Gold Glove awards? The managers and coaches from all 30 teams, who probably know a lot more about what makes a good shortstop than most. And I highly doubt that they voted for Jeter because he is popular.

Capitalizing off players who are struggling is not the same as reporting it and Jeter is a prime example. I know it sells papers and draws in viewers but is it worth bringing down one of the good guys?

Remember when the NY Post photo-shopped Jeter wearing a Red Sox uniform; or when GM Brian Cashman and Skipper Joe Girardi‘s quotes were taken out of context to make it seem like Jeter was an incompetent shortstop and the outfield was inevitable? I sure do.

Just a week ago when Jeter exited the Tigers game in the eighth inning with a sore hip, the media reported him as being benched the next night, when Girardi clearly said he gave Jeter the night off. Big difference between the two scenarios.

I could go on forever rehashing examples of all the Jeter bashing that has gone on, but if you are thinking this is just another arrogant Yankee fan who would never insult the great Derek Jeter then you are completely correct.

I love Jeter and I want him to do well. At the same time I am realistic that age plays a part in his profession, but why doesn’t that rule seem to apply to everyone? I fully admit that Jeter is not the same player he once was, but I will not act like he should check-in to the nearest nursing home or imply that the Yankees should look into electric wheelchairs to cart the Captain in either.

I mean how many ‘baseball experts’ picked the San Francisco Giants to repeat in 2011 but just overlooked who would be manning shortstop for them? Or what about Marlins Hanley Ramirez just getting his first homerun last week after posting 21 strikeouts? Or why Boston’s Dustin Pedroia is struggling or how Phillies Raul Ibanez was 0-57 until three days ago and he will be 40 years-old this June?

All I am saying is play fair with all players, not just the popular ones. Especially since most of Jeter’s biggest critics have already hooped right back on the Captain’s bang wagon again, that is for sure.

Now go find someone else to pick on because the Captain is just starting to get his stride back, and I can assure you he won’t be the one looking foolish in the end.

 

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